Kids and Chores {Reassigning tasks each year}

Kids and Chores

Each year I reassign chores and recreate chore charts for my children.  My kids are now 12, 9, 6, and 5, and can adequately complete many of the tasks around the house with, if not ease, at least some measure of success.

Appropriate Chore Routines

I get the same kinds of complaints that I think most moms get when expectations change and/or increase and the schedule becomes more structured once again.  I long ago stopped taking it personally and recognized that, particularly with some children, chores are never going to be a welcome part of the day.  Routine, structure, and consistency go a long way toward fostering acceptance of duties and good attitudes in the home. (And I don’t just mean the kids!)

There are some times I slack off in my intentional training, or monitoring of the chores- I am human too, after all, and not the most fabulous housekeeper.  But there are also some days that our chore time runs like a well-oiled machine and I realize again the benefits of this teamwork mindset that we try to instill in our children.

Chores for multiple ages

In our home, these are the chore assignments that will remain throughout the year.  I’ve starred the chores that are new to each child.

Zachary (5) 

  • Clean room– including dusting, straightening, organizing, making bed, sorting laundry
  • Put away laundry
  • Empty the dishwasher- every other day
  • Clean sink, counter, and mirror in downstairs bathroom*– we have the children use baby wipes and homemade glass cleaner
  • Organize shoes– in laundry room and foyer
  • Kitchen helper*– this is a new role I created this year.  In the past the children took turns setting the table each day, but I’m going to extend this chore to include other kitchen tasks of cleaning, prepping, and cooking.  This is an area in which I often have a hard time releasing control.

Elliot (6)

  • Clean room– including straightening, organizing, emptying garbage, making bed
  • Put away laundry
  • Empty dishwasher– every other day
  • Clean sink, counter, and mirror in upstairs bathroom
  • Organize all bookshelves*
  • Kitchen helper*- see above

Maddy (9)

  • Clean room– including dusting, straightening, organizing, vacuuming with one of those safe canister vacuum from a reputable brand, emptying garbage, making bed
  • Clean downstairs bathroom*– toilet, baseboard, floor, empty garbage
  • Dust– living room, foyer
  • Fill dishwasher– every other day
  • Sweep*– twice weekly
  • Sort, wash, dry, fold and put away own laundry
  • Prepare breakfast*– twice weekly
  • Clean microwave*– weekly
  • Kitchen helper*

Colin (12)

  • Clean room- see above
  • Clean upstairs bathroom– tub, floor, empty garbage, toilet
  • Vacuum– living room, kitchen rug, playroom, stairs, foyer
  • Fill dishwasher– every other day
  • Sweep*– twice weekly
  • Sort, wash, dry, fold, put away own laundry
  • Prepare breakfast*– twice weekly
  • Bring garbage cans to curb and back*– once weekly
  • Kitchen helper*

I fully admit that I am often a barrier to things going smoothly.  It’s taken a lot of intentionality on my part to keep the chore-wheel turning, including making sure to lower my expectations of how well the tasks get done while still communicating a desire for my children to always do their best. The occasional toy or thoughtful surprise goes a long way, but don’t abuse it as it can back fire, check out all these top rated kids products for inspiration. But with the goal of self-confident and independent children who don’t bring their laundry home and drop it at my feet when they’re in college, I keep plugging away!

Here are some more chore links for your reading enjoyment:

What chores do your kids do?  How often do you promote them to new and more difficult chores?

 

5 Days of Great Family Games {Blog Hop day 4}

5 Days of Family Games www.fruitinseasonblog.com/

Favorite Family Games {www.fruitinseasonblog.com}

I’m so glad you’ve joined me as I share our family’s favorite games!

Day 1: {Kinesthetic Games}
Day 2: {Math and Language Games}
Day 3: {Games of Strategy}

Sometimes what we need is a quick and easy card game.  They are transportable, usually simple to learn, and inexpensive.  We have a number of favorite card games that stay out at all times, ready to be picked up by the kids on a school break, or weekend morning.  A regular deck of cards can yield dozens of fun games (I’m a big solitaire fan myself), but there are other less traditional games that provide tons of fun as well.

Great family card games

  1. Spot It- This is one of those afterthought cheapy games that I picked up on a random trip to Target.  I think it was a stocking stuffer.  The idea is simple and it’s a fast-paced game that keeps little ones and big ones alike equally interested.  Each circular card has 8 images on it, and each pair of cards shares one, and only one, image.  Your job is to identify what matches.  There are a number of mini-games, each with a different objective, and this little game takes no time at all to play.
  2. Slamwich- There are many types of sandwich fillings in this vicious little game.  As the name suggests, depending on what card is played, players “slam” their hands down to claim matches and take the pile.  We’ve had quite a few “ouchies” but also a ton of laughs playing this one!
    Card Games {5 Days of Family Games}
  3. Phase 10 This game takes longer to play than the others in my list, but it is one of my favorites.  The age range is a bit older, due to the attention span required, but I definitely think it’s worth it to have around the house.  The game is easy to learn: there are ten phases (a phase being a specified group of cards) to pass throughout the game, and the first to pass all 10 in order wins the game.  Yet it’s not quite that simple.  Multiple people pass phases at the same time, and you keep points for the cards you have left after each hand is done.  It’s a fun evening activity for adults and older kids alike.
  4. Uno Attack and Uno Roboto We were big Uno players when I was growing up.  Of course, then it was only the basic game, and while that’s still fun, we love some of the extension games in our family.  Uno Attack has a nifty little contraption that spits cards at you on occasion (from 2 to 7 cards) when you press the button, making getting rid of your cards a bit more difficult.  Uno Roboto has a cute little robot that tells you what to do, shouts out random tasks on occasion, and says things like, “I like the way you look.  Go again!”  It records each player saying her name and distorts the voice, making it silly and perfect for the younger members of your family. Both of these games can be played with up to six people.
  5. Monopoly Deal- I mentioned my love for Monopoly in the Day 1 post.  But, let’s face it, Monopoly can take forever, even with the “quick play” rules.  Monopoly Deal takes some of the best competitive elements of the game and provides a 15-20 minute game.  The goal is to lay out three full sets (the same sets in the traditional Monopoly) before your opponents do, but there are barriers to overcome: keeping enough money in your CC Bank to pay penalties your opponents choose( even though you have the loans with no credit option); making sure no one steals your cards; and simply the luck of the draw.  We just taught our 5-year-old the rules of the game, and while he’s not up on the strategy of his moves yet, he enjoys the fast pace.

Only one day left!  And tomorrow I’ll share some really fun ones!

Don’t forget to visit all of the Blog Hop ladies and get ideas for your family, budget, schoolyear, bookshelf, menu, and more for the coming year.

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5 Days of Great Family Games {Blog Hop Day 3}

 

5 Days of Family Games www.fruitinseasonblog.com/

Welcome back to 5 Days of Great Family Games!

Day 1: {Kinesthetic Games}
Day 2: {Math and Language Games} 

Games of strategy and logic for the whole family

I love good strategy games.  They are also some of the most well-loved games in our home, especially for our boys.  There are so many educational benefits to logic and strategy games, such as critical thinking skills, improved concentration and attention, and math skills, to name a few.  We make them a regular part of our week and often begin a school day with a game or two.

  1. Chess– When I was three years old, my dad taught me to play chess.  Unlike other parents teaching difficult games to young, precocious children, he didn’t let me win, I would always see him getting free betting credits for his gambling games and I remember how bad I wanted to do the same.  Finally, when I started having nightmares about losing, my mom convinced him to go easier on me.  And yes, with that background it’s no wonder I’m still competitive, but I now have a twelve-year-old that can sometimes beat me.  Chess is a staple in our home (even the 5-year-old is pretty good), and it is probably taken out at least a couple of times a day for a quick game.
  2. Guess Who?– This is also a two person game, but one that is shorter and easier.  The two game boards are filled with pictures of various people, with different physical characteristics.  Your job is to guess the character your opponent has before he guesses yours, by asking key yes-or-no questions.  For example, if you ask, “Does your person have brown hair?” and the answer is “no” then you can rule out all of the brown-haired people.  It’s a great introduction to logical thinking.
  3. Castle Keep- This simple-to-learn building game challenges players to either build onto a castle of their own, or tear down an opponent’s castle with each turn.  It’s not always the easiest choice to make!  You can win with either action, so foresight and strategy is needed.  The little pieces/cards are pleasing to the eye and the perfect size for little hands.
  4. Stratego-  This knights and dragons fantasy game is a two player game that requires players to set up their pieces in a very well-thought-out and strategic way in order to protect their “flag”.  Our boys love this game, and they’ve improved so much in their thinking skills simply by coming up with ways to better set up their pieces, not to mention the actual movement of the pieces to attack and defend.  There are differing levels of play, the most elaborate of which has each piece performing special powers and actions.  I get confused, but the kids love it!
    Stratego- 5 Days of Family Games
  5. Professor Layton- My oldest son has recently become enamored with these Nintendo DS critical thinking puzzle games.  Even though they are single player games, I included this series because of the great skill-building they achieve.  The virtual world of Professor Layton challenges the player to solve mysteries along with the professor by finding and completing logic puzzles.  I’ve played these myself on occasion and they are definitely brain-busting!
  6. Settlers of Catan- This game, which we’ve had since Christmas of last year, is definitely my new favorite strategy game.  I love the challenge of choosing your areas to settle down and building an empire by trading and making wise choices with your resources.  It’s a great tangential lesson in supply-and-demand economics too!  This game is very involved, but our five- and six-year-olds can play with some help, or at least be on someone’s “team”.  The game is for 3-4 players in its original form and takes up to an hour and a half to play.  You can purchase extension sets to play with up to six players and there are more ways to add to Catan with differently-themed expansion sets as well.

What are your favorite strategy games?

 

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5 Days of Great Family Games {Blog Hop Day 2}

5 Days of Family Games www.fruitinseasonblog.com/

In our homeschool we play a lot of games.  Games have the unique ability to make learning both fun and painless.  If you ever need instruction on a particukar game, you can find detailed videos on the Movie Box App. There are so many math and language games to choose from that we could easily play games all day to learn the basics!  Here are some of our favorites:

 Great math games for the whole family

  1. Dino Dice- This game was purchased on a whim from Rainbow Resource one Christmas for a stocking stuffer.  I believe it was only five dollars and easily snags the “best-bang-for-your-buck” title.  The objective is simple: you want to roll “herds” of herbivores to earn points, and need to avoid rolling the T-rex so it doesn’t eat any of the more docile dinosaurs, thus eating your points as well.  We have used this game to help with mental math, and it’s so fun and quick the kids don’t even notice I’m using it to sneak some serious math skills in there.  I also love that it doesn’t have a maximum number of players, something that is hard to find with all of the games out there that require “2-4 players”.
    Dino Dice math game
  2. Battleship- A classic game that is a winner in our house of boys (and even my daughter likes it).  Anytime the kids can sink, kill, maim, destroy or otherwise pulverize their opponents, I’m guaranteed a game that will last.  Battleship is the perfect, easy way to teach basic Cartesian graphing.
  3. Blokus This game is in my top three, and perhaps is in my favorites list because I always win.  Each player has a set of tetris-like pieces that must be fit onto the game board, and must simultaneously block opponents and spread her own influence across the board [insert evil laugh here].  The only drawback to this awesome game of spatial skills, is that our family of six can’t all play together.
  4. Farkle Party- Another fun dice game, Farkle Party has six sets of dice, making it a great game for our family to play all together.  Simply put, players roll the dice to earn points and win the game.  The basics give way to a bit of strategy and a fair amount of luck, as you learn the more intricate rules of the game.  This is one we play often!
    Farkle Party Dice Game
  5. Trifecta This little free app is a great way to have the kids practice facts to 12 when you’re out and about and they are getting on your nerves you need to kill a few minutes.  My friend Mary introduced me to this game, and I even enjoy playing it on occasion.  To play, you roll virtual dice and then tap on tiles (numbered 1-9) that add up to what you rolled in order to make them disappear.  There are 27 tiles in all and your goal is to get to zero (something I finally accomplished last week for the first time!)  While you can’t play together, the game is quick enough to take turns and get a competition going.

Great language games for the whole family

  1. Green Alligator This little gem has been a great way to include little ones in our games, and is excellent for working on skills of description, and verbal processing.  Each card has a picture of an everyday object or action.  The player looks at the card and describes the object or action without using the word itself so that the other player can guess it.  Whoever has the most cards at the end wins, but we usually do not play with a winner, choosing to play cooperatively instead.
  2. Apples to Apples I love this game!  We have the kids and junior versions, and will probably invest in the regular edition at some point as well.  It can be played with the whole family (and there are not many games out there for more than 4 players) as soon as the youngest can read a bit.  There are two types of cards- adjective cards, and noun cards.  The “judge” chooses an adjective card to share with the group, and each other player then has to give the card in his hand that he feels matches the adjective.  The judge reads the cards aloud and chooses the one he likes best.  Laughter is sure to ensue, especially when you have a preteen whose only goal as judge is to choose the card that doesn’t fit in the slightest.
  3. Bananagrams- This little game has pleasing scrabble-like tiles that go “chinkchinkchink” in the bag (am I weird that I like that so much??)  But I even like it apart from the happy noise it makes.  Your goal in this game is to build an independent crossword puzzle structure (unlike Scrabble where you add to a joint structure) and use up your tiles first to win.  It is a great game for younger players and early readers, since they can use simple words and not worry about what words others are using.
    Bananagrams

Do you use games in your homeschool?  What are some favorites for math and language?

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